Category
Theater

The Foreigner at the Camelot Theatre


The Foreigner

April 26 – May 21, 2017
The Foreigner
Starring Shirley Patton
Directed by Joanna Goff
Tickets: $18 – $34

The Foreigner

The Foreigner

Local Rogue Valley theatre legend Shirley Patton will once again grace the Camelot stage starring in The Foreigner. The scene is a fishing lodge in rural Georgia often visited by “Froggy” LeSeuer. This time Froggy has brought along a friend, a pathologically shy young man named Charlie who is overcome with fear at the thought of making conversation with strangers. Froggy must leave, so in an attempt to help his shy friend, he tells Betty (Patton), the owner of the lodge that Charlie is a foreigner that neither speaks nor understands English. Once alone the fun really begins, as Charlie overhears more than he should – the evil plans of a sinister, two-faced minister and his redneck associate. What he does fuels the nonstop hilarity of the play and sets up the wildly funny climax in which things go uproariously awry for the “bad guys,” and the “good guys” emerge triumphant.

Camelot Theatre Company is located in Talent, Oregon in the beautiful Rogue Valley, just a few miles north of Ashland. We perform in the brand new state-of-the-art James M. Collier Theatre. Here is our Mission Statement:

To be of service to the Rogue Valley, Oregon, by producing high-quality affordable plays, musicals and musical events while providing a supportive environment for professional and amateur theatre artists and technicians and inspiring and training adults, teens and children in the theatre arts.

For more information and to purchase tickets to this performance at the Camelot Theatre go to their website.

 

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Calendar Girls at the Camelot Theatre


“Calendar Girls”

At the Camelot Theater ‘Calendar Girls’ —  February 8 – 26, 2017

Written by Tim Firth
Directed by Gwen Overland

Tickets: $18 – $34

Calendar Girls

Calendar Girls, play, based on the screenplay of the same name, is actually based on a true story in the small town of Knapely, Yorkshire, England. A member of the local Women’s Institute, Annie Clarke recently lost her husband to cancer. She was inspired by her husband’s speech to the local Women’s Institute, in which he said, “the flowers of Yorkshire are like the women of Yorkshire”, and “the last phase of the women of Yorkshire is always the most glorious.” Annie’s best friend Chris Harper decides to make a calendar with twelve local nude middle-age women to raise funds for the wing of leukemia treatment in the local hospital. The calendar becomes wildly and globally successful — with some unintended consequences.

About Camelot Theatre

Camelot Theatre Company is located in Talent, Oregon in the beautiful Rogue Valley, just a few miles north of Ashland. In just a few minutes drive from excellent lodging in Ashland OR, the Chanticleer Inn B&B.

The Camelot has a wonderful new state-of-the-art building, the James M. Collier Theatre. Here is the Mission Statement:

To be of service to the Rogue Valley, Oregon, by producing high-quality affordable plays, musicals and musical events while providing a supportive environment for professional and amateur theatre artists and technicians and inspiring and training adults, teens and children in the theatre arts.

You can read a short history of the theatre company if you click here.

For more information and to purchase tickets to this performance at the Camelot Theatre go to their website.

 

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Noises Off at the Oregon Cabaret Theatre


Oregon Cabaret Theatre: Noises Off

Noises Off

Oregon Cabaret Theatre Presents: “Noises Off”

February 9 – April 9, 2017

Critic Frank Rich claimed:
Noises Off is, was, and probably always will be
the funniest play written in my lifetime.”

A classic door-slamming backstage comedy Noises Off reveals behind the scenes of the mounting of a new farce, Nothing On. It’s a story told in three acts with a rotating set, providing us looks both onstage and off as the ill-fated new farce careens from catastrophic dress rehearsals to historically hilarious failures during its run.

The idea for the farce came when playwright Michael Frayn was standing in the wings watching a performance of The Two of Us, a farce that he had written for Lynn Redgrave. Frayn noticed the show was funnier from backstage than from the audience’s perspective. This inspired him to write a farce from behind the scenes.

For more information and tickets go to Oregon Cabaret Theatre’s website.

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What August Wilson Means Now


New York Times Critics on August Wilson

What August Wilson Mean Now” a New York Times article, critics Ben Brantley and Wesley Morris talk about August Wilson’s use of language and representation. This article is well worth the read.

Because of Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s productions of Wilson’s plays, I have been introduce to, and have come to love, August Wilson. I wish OSF would do his entire canon. It’s my personal goal to see all 10 plays that chronicle African-American lives in the Hill District of Pittsburgh — one play for each decade of the 20th century.

This 2017 season, OSF will produce Unison. With Wilson’s poetry, UNIVERSES, uses multimedia, poetry, dance, and music to weave a mythically current story of a dying poet. This poet leaves a box to apprentice with instructions to destroy it. Like Pandora of old, the apprentice opens the box; and releases the terrors that tormented his master.
OSF says: “This world premiere fuses poetry, theatre, dance, and music to explore the reconstruction of collective memory, bringing Wilson’s words to a new century and a new generation“.
I venture to guess that the powerful language he employs in his plays will also be present in his poetry.

Portrait of August Wilson

August Wilson

 

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Ashland New Plays Festival Reads Edward III


Edward III, a New Play Reading

In March 2017, Ashland New Plays Festival, partnering with OSF, will produce a new play reading of Shakespeare’s Edward III. The play’s language will not be in King James’ English, but will instead be translated to modern English. As part of their “Play On!” project, OSF commissioned the renowned playwright Octavio Solis to translate Shakespeare’s Edward III play. This play will be one of the first to be presented among the 39 plays in OSF’s project.

Date: Monday, March 27, 2017
Location: SOU Music Recital Hall
Time: 8:00pm

Octavio Solis, Playwright and Translator of Edward III

Octavio Solis, Playwright and Translator of Edward III

About the Ashland New Plays Festival

For a number of years, I have attended the Ashland New Plays Festival. Of late, I have increasingly been impressed with the quality of work from Ashland New Plays Festival. With their new Artistic Director Kyle Haden, they have expanded from just a 5-day new play reading festival in October to much more. Starting in the Spring of 2017 there will be a number of events, including the reading of a new play Edward III. 

Ashland New Plays Festival’s mission is to assist playwrights in the development of new works through public readings and offers an educational forum to the community through discussions and workshops. Many of the new plays selected go on to being produced by notable regional theaters, such as Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

Last fall, Kyle Haden was interviewed by the Daily Tidings, go here for the article.

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2017 Oregon Shakespeare Festival Plays: The Outlook


2017 Oregon Shakespeare Festival Plays: The Outlook

December is when the general public can start buying tickets for 2017 Oregon Shakespeare Festival plays.

Frequently I am asked about what I know and think about the upcoming plays. I can’t predict the future (wouldn’t that be nice!). I try to see all plays when they are in preview, and then write reviews; however sometimes the word quickly gets out about which one are the ‘don’t miss’ plays, then the tickets are hard to get. I think next year will be no exception.

The past can frequently predict the future

I can share with you a remarkably consistent pattern I’ve noticed over the last 15 years. Every season there are more than a few plays nearly every guest loves. Most of the time those plays are the new(er) plays, often those produced in the Thomas theater, and plays with social justice themes. I don’t think this pattern will be any different next year. Thus I look forward to seeing these 2017 Oregon Shakespeare Festival plays: Mojada: A Medea in Los Angeles, Hannah and the Dread Gazebo, and Off the Rails. Personally, I have loved every play August Wilson has written, and I am a fan of poetry, so in addition to the ‘modern’ plays, I eagerly await Unison.

Furthermore, given how well done 2016’s Richard II was, I think the two Henrys are going to be in that ‘don’t miss’ category. Jeffrey King, who played Henry Bolingbrooke in Richard II, will continue with his same character into the Henrys. I am really looking forward to seeing the History plays.

Three of the Festival’s accomplished and popular actors, Danforth Comins, Rodney Gardiner, and Armando Durán, are leads in Julius Caesar. Given current political events, the subtext in this play will no doubt evoke more powerful reactions than other past Julius Caesar plays.

I am interested in seeing what OSF will do with Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. At first I had reservations – Disney! Really? But since then I have heard that instead of strictly controlling the production to be a replica of every other Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, OSF has been given free rein to produce it how they want. Which is the reason OSF’s write up says: “Think you know the Disney musical? Think again. Expect originality, surprises and ingenuity in OSF’s gorgeous and powerful new rendition.” Personally, I hope OSF will evoke more the original 18th century version.

Based on current reservations for the Chanticleer Inn B&B, it already looks like we’re going to be busy next year. Yet, there are still plenty of rooms available during the 2017 summer months and more during the early and late part of the season.

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Decision Tree for Shakespeare Plays


Which Shakespeare Play Should You See First?

by Mya Gosling.

I found this ‘cartoon’ both humous and a fairly good breakdown of Shakespeare’s canon. To see more of Mya Gosling’s work go to her website called Peace, Good-Tickle Brain

Mya Gosling Flowchart

Mya Gosling’s Flowchart to Find a Shakespeare Play

 

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Neil Simon “I Ought to Be in Pictures” at the Camelot Theatre


I Ought to Be in Pictures

A Play Written by Neil Simon

October 12 – November 6, 2016

Neil Simon

“I Ought to Be In Pictures” by Neil Simon

 

About Neil Simon Play I Ought To Be In Pictures

In this Tony Award winning play, Herb Tucker, a Hollywood scriptwriter currently “freelancing”, is surprised when his forgotten past reappears in the form of Libby, his teenage daughter who’s trekked from Brooklyn to West Hollywood with hopes of becoming a movie star. Left 16 years ago, Libby barely remembers her father, but she is convinced that Herb holds the keys to the Hollywood Kingdom! With Steffy (his on and off again girlfriend) at his side, Herb decides to take another stab at fatherhood and hopefully this time, get it right.

About Camelot Theatre

Camelot Theatre Company is located in Talent, Oregon in the beautiful Rogue Valley, just a few miles north of Ashland. In just a few minutes drive from excellent lodging in Ashland OR, the Chanticleer Inn B&B.

The Camelot has a wonderful new state-of-the-art building, the James M. Collier Theatre. Here is the Mission Statement:
To be of service to the Rogue Valley, Oregon, by producing high-quality affordable plays, musicals and musical events while providing a supportive environment for professional and amateur theatre artists and technicians and inspiring and training adults, teens and children in the theatre arts.

You can read a short history of the theatre company if you click here.

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Inherit the Wind at the Camelot Theatre


“Inherit the Wind” a play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee

At the Camelot Theatre, April 27 – May 29, 2016

Inherit the Wind poster/playbill for the Camelot theater

Inherit the Wind

Inherit the Wind, the story:

While this Tony Award winning play debuted in 1955, its story is as relevant today as it was then. One of the most outstanding dramas of our time, Inherit the Wind is a fictionalized account of the 1925 Scopes “Monkey” Trial.

The controversial subject of evolution versus creation causes two polar opposites to engage in one explosive battle of beliefs. Attorney Henry Drummond faces off against fundamentalist leader Matthew Harrison Brady in a small Tennessee town where teacher Bertram Cates has been brought to trial for teaching Darwinism.

Says playwright Lawrence, “We used the teaching of evolution as a parable, a metaphor for any kind of mind control. It’s not about science versus religion. It’s about the right to think.”

About the Camelot Theatre:

Camelot Theatre Company is located in Talent, Oregon in the beautiful Rogue Valley, just a few miles north of Ashland. The Camelot has a wonderful new state-of-the-art building, the James M. Collier Theatre. Here is our Mission Statement:

To be of service to the Rogue Valley, Oregon, by producing high-quality affordable plays, musicals and musical events while providing a supportive environment for professional and amateur theatre artists and technicians and inspiring and training adults, teens and children in the theatre arts.

You can read a short history of the theatre company if you click here.

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Oregon Shakespeare Festival 2016 Season


OSF 2016 Season

Oregon Shakespeare Festival 2016 season opens this coming weekend.

In its 81st year the Oregon Shakespeare Festival is still inventive and sizzling. In the last 10 years, Oregon Shakespeare Festival has produced 29 world premieres. Some of those plays, OSF commissioned — and one got the Tony!

Personally, I look forward to the newly minted plays, some of them become my season favorites. For this season, the River Bride which premiers early is one of those I am looking forward to seeing, but there will be others!

Oregon Shakespeare Festival 2016

River Bride

Last fall, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival announced that they will be commissioning 36 playwrights to translate 39 Shakespeare plays into contemporary modern English. Lively debates ensued (understatement) and will probably continue for some time. My bet is these plays will be very well received and will successfully be bridges for younger generations, who never became comfortable with, or were never introduced to, King James’ English, to cross over and embrace the original Shakespeare plays.

Go to the Portland Monthly magazine Oregon Shakespeare Festival 2016 season article for their description of the opening plays for the 2016 season…

 

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