Category
Nature-viewing

Lithia Park — Duck Pond with Maple Trees


Lithia Park

Lithia Park

Lithia Park, Duck Pond and Foliage

By far my favorite time to be in Lithia Park!  The park truly offers a four-season experience, but the colors of the Autumn are particularly stunning.

 

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Posted by:
Ellen

Posted on:
November 2nd, 2014

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Klamath Bird Observatory Talk: Beautiful Birds, Beautiful Words


Klamath Bird Observatory Talk

Klamath Bird Observatory Talk

Klamath Bird Observatory Presents on October 15th, “Beautiful Birds, Beautiful Words”

Klamath Bird Observatory Board Member Shannon Rio combines bird photography with poetry, myth, and lore in this presentation that celebrates nature, literature, and our connection to words.

Details: Wednesday October 15th from 6:30–8:00pm, Ages 10-Adult, event is at North Mountain Park Nature Center, and cost is $10. Pre-register online at www.ashland.or.us/register or call the Nature Center at 541–488-6606.

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Posted by:
Ellen

Posted on:
October 9th, 2014

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Lithia Park, Designated “Great Places in America: Public Spaces”


Lithia Park Ashland Creek

Lithia Park Azaleas on Ashland Creek, [photo by: Ellen Campbell]

Lithia Park in Ashland Oregon Listed in American Planning Association’s “Great Places” for 2014

Lithia Park is truly the gem of Ashland. Locals  and visitors of Ashland already know and enjoy  Lithia Park — it’s truly the town’s heart and soul.  A place to meet friends,  hike trails, admire seasonal changes in the park, listen to concerts, play and even meditate.

This year Lithia Park is listed in American Planning Association’s (APA) “Great Places” program in the Public Spaces category.  This program honors places of exemplary character, quality, and planning.  Annually selected, Great Places meet a gold standard and criteria that have a substantial sense of place, cultural and historical interest, community involvement, and a vision for tomorrow.

According to APA:
APA Great Places offer better choices for where and how people work and live. They are enjoyable, safe, and desirable. They are places where people want to be — not only to visit, but to live and work every day. America’s truly great streets, neighborhoods and public spaces are defined by many criteria, including architectural features, accessibility, functionality, and community involvement.

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Ellen

Posted on:
October 2nd, 2014

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Fledged Screech Owls


Screech Owls! Great photo from KBO

screech owls

We’re watching you”   Photo © Peter J Thiemann.

These are the very same Screech Owl babies  who were ‘disrupting’ the plays in the Elizabethan theater earlier in the season.

As soon as the music started up or actors started to say their lines, the owlets would join in. The audience could hear them in the ‘background’ [thankfully they weren’t miked] and it sounded like the sound system was having a problem.

When they were hungry and calling for food from their parent, they were even louder. There’s a reason they are called “Screech Owls”!

Now that they are fully fledged (as you can see by the picture) and learning to hunt for themselves, it’s been much quieter in the theater.

This photo comes from Klamath Bird Observatory Facebook page.

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Ellen

Posted on:
July 21st, 2014

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Wading Fawn


A Thirsty Fawn After Eating My Petunias

There comes a time in a fawns’ life [for about a week] when they are old enough to wander away from their mothers, but still small enough to get through the gates by squeezing between the 4 inch bars.

This morning one pictured below was twice found in the back yard.  About 30 minutes after ushering it out of the yard, it returned for seconds on the petunias.  After nibbling on more petunias, it then slipped into the pond.

It seemed content to stay in the pond.  It stood nearly chest deep and drank deeply. After it drank its fill and I had taken a few pictures, I stroked it on the back to encourage it to move out of the pond.  I was somewhat concerned about its sharp hooves standing on the rubber pond liner.  It bounded out of pond and made its way into the front yard.

Thankfully the mother was no where to be found.  She can’t get into the backyard.   We’re wondering where she was all the time her baby was frolicking behind the bars.

For those who are curious, the fur is not that soft. The hair felt thick and wiry, a little like a terriers’.

Fawn in the Pond

Wading Fawn

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Ellen

Posted on:
June 23rd, 2014

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Fawn Born in the Chanticleer’s Garden


A Fawn is Born

Less than a few hours old

The Fawn Less Than a Few Hours Old

A baby deer arrived early Sunday morning on June 8th — the newest addition to the “herd”.

For a couple of weeks before, each afternoon the mother hid in my rhodies under my bedroom window. It was obvious that she had selected the rhodies for the delivery room. 
A number of years ago, there was another doe that delivered her babies in the same place each year … it might be the case this doe was one of her babies who now is birthing her fawn under the same rhodies.
The image is blurry, but you can see how small it is compared to the mother’s leg. She got nervous with me taking pictures and led the baby across the street.
Fawn

The Fawn Skittering Across the Street

 

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Posted by:
Ellen

Posted on:
June 12th, 2014

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Upper Table Rock, it’s spring!


Wild Flowers at Upper Table Rock

Upper Table Rock Henderson Fawn Lily

Upper Table Rock Henderson Fawn Lily

Upper Table Rock is one of the two mesas just north of Medford.  You can see them from I-5 at the north end of the Rogue Valley.

There are a nice hikes to the top of both mesas with wonderful views of the Rogue Valley.  Upper Table Rock as well as Lower Table Rock are two of my favorite early spring hiking trails.

It’s that time of the year again, spring flowers are popping.  Fawn Lilies, buttercups, desert parsley are flowering.  Hounds tongue, camas and lupine are leafing out.  With little rain, the flowers might not last long, but they are beautiful!

 

 

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Posted by:
Ellen

Posted on:
March 17th, 2014

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First Annual Mountain Bird Festival in Ashland


On the Mountain Bird Festival's 'target' list, the beautiful Mountain Bluebird. Photo by David Hodkinson

The beautiful Mountain Bluebird is on the festival’s target list. Photo by David Hodkinson

Mountain Bird Festival hosted by the Klamath Bird Observatory

Ashland, Oregon, May 30 through June 1, 2014

Mountain Bird festival offers 3 days of guided bird walks and keynote presentations with half-day and full-day field trips both Saturday and Sunday.

Klamath Bird Observatory will host this community conservation event in the spring of 2014 in Ashland, Oregon. The festival combines a celebration of nature with the stewardship ethic needed to ensure thriving landscapes for humans and wildlife. Every person who participates in this festival will become a significant steward of the science that drives bird conservation.

Extend your stay and enjoy more of Ashland and its surrounds: wineries, theaters, hiking, art galleries, restaurants.

Follow this link for more information on the Klamath Bird Observatory’s Mountain Bird Festival.

The mountain birds of interest migrate through the Siskiyou and Cascade mountains, many viewing areas are easy driving distance from the town of  Ashland, Oregon.  The ‘target’ list includes: Redhead, Common Merganser, Mountain Quail, nesting Sandhill Cranes, nesting Osprey, Ferruginous Hawk, Swainson’s Hawk, dancing Western and Clark’s Grebes, Wilson’s Snipe, Black Terns, Great Gray Owl, Western Screech-Owl, Vaux’s Swift, Calliope Hummingbird, Prairie Falcon, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Williamson’s Sapsucker, White-headed Woodpecker, Hammond’s Flycatcher, Dusky Flycatcher, Cassin’s Vireo, Mountain Chickadee, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Townsend’s Solitaire, Mountain Bluebird, Hermit Warbler, MacGillivray’s Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Green-tailed Towhee, Vesper Sparrow, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Lazuli Bunting.

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Posted by:
Ellen

Posted on:
March 15th, 2014

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Southern Oregon Lavender Trail Festival


Lavender Fields Forever Farm in the Applegate Valley

Lavender Fields Forever Farm in the Applegate Valley

Instead of tending the inn’s garden today, my friend Peggy enticed me out to play tourist in the and check out the lavender farms in the Applegate Valley area.

Peggy has been anxious to pick lavender and replenish her dried flower arrangements.  I have been wanting to familiarize myself with the farms and view the gardens. The Southern Oregon Lavender Trail Festival allowed us to indulge in our desires.

Lavender farming is a relatively new thing in the area.  Four farms are up and running; and there are 2 additional farms starting up in 2014.

The two farms that most favorably impressed us were: Lavender Fields Forever and Applegate Valley Lavender Farm.  Thankfully they are the ones closest to Jacksonville!  I like the idea of giving people something else to do while wine tasting — inserting a lavender farm or two between the tasting stops.

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Posted by:
Ellen

Posted on:
July 15th, 2013

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Walk or bike Crater Lake E. Rim Dr. June 22 & 23


THIS WEEKEND ONLY: Crater Lake’s East Rim Drive Opens for Non-Motorized Recreation

June 22 and 23, 2013 East Rim Drive circling Crater Lake will be open to non-motorized traffic only.  Early snow melt allows the park to offer this rare opportunity to enjoy Crater Lake at a slower and quieter pace for pedestrians and bicyclists.

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Posted by:
Ellen

Posted on:
June 20th, 2013

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