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Hiking

Mount McLoughlin View from Grizzly Peak


Mount McLoughlin from Grizzly Peak’s Trail Head

Mount McLoughlin

Mount McLoughlin

Mount McLoughlin, easily viewable from the Rogue Valley, is a “Fujiyama-esque” lava cone built on top of a composite volcano.  For most years, and sometimes all year round, there usually is snow on top.  Lately however due to the lack of winter rains, this mountain is bare and brown — like too many other peaks in the Cascades.

Its elevation is about 9,495 feet.  When I see that number, I always think, surely a team of burly and determined youths should haul up rocks and dirt to obtain an extra 5 feet so the height would be a nice round 9,500 ft.

 

 

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Hiking in Ashland: the TID Ditch Today


Hiking in Ashland

Rocks, Moss and Madrones while hiking in Ashland

Hiking in Ashland

It’s easy to do hiking in Ashland … go out the front door and walk uphill a few blocks.  There are wonderful trails and country roads all throughout the “water shed” — an area that forms the foothills of Mt. Ashland.
Today I walked along “the ditch”, as the locals refer to the Talent Irrigation District Ditch.  A water way source that comes from the mountain lakes in the Cascades, the ditch was built in the early part of the last century for agricultural use around Ashland.  Now it’s a back up source, if/when the water from Mt. Ashland dips too low.

I love hiking in Ashland, you can get out into the country within mere minutes.

For more information go to the Ashland Trails Organization website

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Wild Flowers on Lower Table Rock Trail


Lower Table Rock Trail flower

Cascade Mariposa Lily

Lower Table Rock Trail

This is one of my  favorite springtime trails, especially during the mid-week. I like that it goes through a few distinct eco-systems, each with its own set of wild flowers. The trail starts from the car park and briefly goes through oak savannah, where you see meadow/woodland flowers, such as camas, buttercups, mariposa lilies, shooting stars, with white oak trees and chaparral.  The trail then steadily winds through more forested and shady section as it climbs up the side of the mesa.  On top of the mesa, is where you can see the mounded prairie and vernal pool plant communities.  The meadow flowers that form concentric circles around the vernal pools are especially striking.  Depending on how much spring rain we get, the vernal pools might be seen as late as early May.  It’s usually better to go in April.

Lower table rock trail vernal pools

Last of the vernal pools with fields of Gold on top of Lower Table Rock Trail

 

 

The Table Rock vernal pools are micro-ecosystems of habitat that support a federally threatened species of fairy shrimp and a state endangered plant called dwarf wooly meadowfoam (Limnanthes floccosa ssp. pumila). This plant is endemic to the Table Rocks, meaning it is found nowhere else in the world.

You can see Mt. McLoughlin and Mt Ashland from the top of the mesa, as well as the Rogue Valley floor stretching south toward the Siskiyous.

 Directions

From Interstate 5, take Exit #33 heading east one mile on East Pine Street and turn north (left) at the second signal onto Table Rock Road.  Drive 10 miles to Wheeler Road and turn west (left).  The sign for Lower Table Rock Trail is well posted. The trail head is accessible off of Wheeler Road.

Lower Table Rock trail

Arrowleaf balsamroot

Details of the Lower Table Rock Trail

The trail is 1.75 miles long. It is a moderately difficult trail approximately .5 miles longer than Upper Table Rock Trail. Lower Table Rock Trail offers interpretive signs for hikers. Water is not available along the trail or at the trailhead. Allow approximately 4 hours for a round trip hike.

For those eager to extend their hike, you may enjoy walking along the abandoned airstrip to the edge of the rock. This will add an extra mile to your trip. The south edge of the rock offers a great view of the unique habitat of Kelly Slough. This wetland lies 800 feet below and provides unique habitat for many aquatic birds.

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Lithia Park Nature Walks — Free


Lithia Park Nature Walks

Ashland Creek

Guided Lithia Park Nature Walks — Free

From May to September, no matter the weather, a trained docent naturalists will lead a fun, informative and easy 1.5 hour nature walk through Ashland’s gem — Lithia Park.

Topics include: trees, flowers, birds, climate, water and history of the park.

Days: Sunday, Wednesday and Friday (Saturday in July and August)
Time: 10 am
Meeting point: park entrance nearest the Plaza

And yes, you can do it all!  You can enjoy the Chanticleer breakfast and get to the nature walk on time without being rushed.

Upper Table Rock, it’s spring!


Wild Flowers at Upper Table Rock

Upper Table Rock Henderson Fawn Lily

Upper Table Rock Henderson Fawn Lily

Upper Table Rock is one of the two mesas just north of Medford.  You can see them from I-5 at the north end of the Rogue Valley.

There are a nice hikes to the top of both mesas with wonderful views of the Rogue Valley.  Upper Table Rock as well as Lower Table Rock are two of my favorite early spring hiking trails.

It’s that time of the year again, spring flowers are popping.  Fawn Lilies, buttercups, desert parsley are flowering.  Hounds tongue, camas and lupine are leafing out.  With little rain, the flowers might not last long, but they are beautiful!

 

 

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Walk or bike Crater Lake E. Rim Dr. June 22 & 23


THIS WEEKEND ONLY: Crater Lake’s East Rim Drive Opens for Non-Motorized Recreation

June 22 and 23, 2013 East Rim Drive circling Crater Lake will be open to non-motorized traffic only.  Early snow melt allows the park to offer this rare opportunity to enjoy Crater Lake at a slower and quieter pace for pedestrians and bicyclists.

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Grizzly Peak: so many flowers and more to come!


On Grizzly Peak, Siskiyou Onion

On Grizzly Peak, Siskiyou Onion

Hiking Grizzly Peak

One of my all time favorite hikes is up on Grizzly Peak.  Northeast of Ashland, Grizzly Peak is the tallest peak viewable from the Chanticleer Inn.

This hike affords great sweeping views: From the car park view Mt. McLoughlin and on a clear day the peaks surrounding Crater Lake. Then from the trail, the entire Rogue and Bear Creek Valleys. Further west and south on the trail you can see Mt. Ashland, Emigrant Lake, Pilot Rock and Mt. Shasta.

The trail is about fairly easy, 5 miles round trip, some elevation gain but not at all difficult. Directions to the trail head.

The Flowers of Grizzly Peak are best part!

From spring to late summer, the flowers are too many to count and each kind is wonderful.  Trail runs through forest, meadows and rocky outcrops: each area is packed with a variety of flowers.  The blooms rotate through the entire season. One can hike Grizzly Peak every two weeks and see different bouquets.

Indian paintbrush Grizzly Peak

 

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Wildflowers on Jacksonville Woodlands Trail


A Vine found on the Jacksonville Woodlands Trail

An orange honeysuckle (Lonicera ciliosa) vine found on the Jacksonville Woodlands Trail

A Day Trip on the Jacksonville Woodlands Trail

Yesterday, friends and I spent an afternoon in Jacksonville.  This is my first time exploring the Jacksonville Woodlands trail system — loved it!

Jacksonville, a darling historic town, is less than 30 minutes from Ashland.  Each time I visit it seems to get better.

The shops are fun to poke around in, but in deference to my [male] friend, instead of antique, toy, and cooking shops, we went for a quick hike through the Jacksonville Woodlands trail system.

The trails switch back and forth above the Britt Festival.  Any number of trail heads are easily accessed near downtown. The hillside is full of native Madrones, Oaks, and lots of little native wildflowers. Spring is the best time to see the wildflowers. The trail is well shaded and would be a great respite from the summer heat.

On the Jacksonville Woodlands trail a Triteleia ixioide in the Lily family, its common names are Golden Brodiaea and Pretty Face.

Triteleia ixioide in the Lily family, its common names are Golden Brodiaea and Pretty Face.

Increasingly there are wine tasting rooms cropping up in downtown proper … recommended by many is Quady North on California St.

One of my favorite eateries is C St. Bistro (closed Sundays).

 

 

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Mt Ashland in February


Sunny and Bright on Mt Ashland

Mt Ashland

Snowshoeing on Mt Ashland

Yesterday, was a perfect day for frolicking in the snow on Mt Ashland.  Locals and visitors alike were out on the mountain downhill/Nordic skiing, boarding and snowshoeing, taking in the sunshine and the views of the Siskiyou and Cascades.

The best kept secret in southern Oregon, if it’s not raining, we have sunshine! Now that might seem like a dumb thing to say, especially if you’re from California.  But in places further north starting, say Eugene, no rain can still mean a gray sunless dreary day  — for what seems like months on end.  But not here in the Rouge Valley!

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KSWild hike, French Flat in the Illinois Valley, 6/2/12


wildflowers

Cook’s Lomatium Wildflowers

Hike with KSWild at French Flat

French Flat is designated as an area of critical environmental concern because of its high plant diversity on rich serpentine soils. The endangered Cook’s Lomatium grows here. This is a gentle 2-mile hike across rare serpentine pine savannah.

Carpool leave Coffee Heaven in Cafe Junction at 10am.

Be prepared for all weather. Bring water and a lunch. For more hikes and details, visit: www.kswild.org/events

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