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Tomato Egg Cups with Creamy Polenta: Chanticleer Inn Favorite


Tomato Egg Cups with Polenta

Tomato egg cups are really easy to do and they present so well. Serve them nestled in a pool of creamy cheesy polenta or in a colorful hash; or serve with a side of roasted potatoes or zucchinis.
The selection of vegetables, meats, and cheese, as well as the amounts, can vary depending on the season and your taste.

For more information about the Chanticleer Inn Cookbook go here.

Tomato Egg Cups Nestled in Polenta

Tomato Egg Cups Nestled in Creamy Polenta

Recipes for Tomato Egg Cups with Polenta

Tomato Egg Cups

6 servings  and  Pre-heat oven 350°F

Use six 4-inch silicone muffin cups lightly sprayed with oil.

The selection of vegetables and cheese, as well as the amounts, can vary depending on the season and your taste. The cook should treat the ingredient list below as a starting point!

Ingredients

  • 2–3 medium sized mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 medium-small zucchini, sliced
  • 6 medium tomatoes
  • 6 broccoli florets, small enough to almost fill each tomato
  • 6 tablespoons cheese, grated (my staff and I prefer strong cheeses, such as, Parmesan, Gorgonzola or cheddar)
  • 8–10 eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk (omit if lactose-free, but increase the number of eggs and amount of salsa)
  • 3–4 tablespoons butter, melted, and cooled
  • 2–3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup green salsa
  • 1–2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, minced (optionally, sage and/or oregano)

Directions

If using silicone muffin cups, lightly spray oil; if using metal muffin tin then liberally spray the muffin tin cups.

Place a zucchini slice at the bottom of each muffin cup and at least three around the cup walls. Also place mushroom slices around the cup walls.

For each tomato, slice the top off and scoop out the pulp. (I save the sliced top, minus the stem core, and the pulp to use in a future frittata) Place each tomato in the middle a silicone/muffin tin cup with the zucchini and mushroom slices evenly encircling the tomato. It’s desirable, but not necessary, if the tomato rim is a little higher than the rim of the cup.

Partially fill each tomato with the grated cheese, if the cheese spills over into the muffin tin that’s fine. Finish by inserting a broccoli floret into each tomato. It’s o.k. if the top of the floret is a little higher than the tomato rim.

In a medium bowl, whisk eggs, milk, butter, and minced garlic, then add salsa. Pour the egg mixture around the tomatoes and some inside each tomato.

Bake the tomato egg cups in a 350°F oven for 15–20 minutes, or until the egg is set.

Polenta

6 servings  Use heavy saucepan

Ingredients

  • 3 cups water (or 2 cup water and 1 cup broth)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup polenta
  • 1/2 cup milk, (alternatively, half & half or sour cream)
  • 1–3 tablespoons butter (optional, but recommended)
  • 1/3 cup gorgonzola

Directions

In a large saucepan, bring the water (or water and broth) and salt to a boil. While whisking, slowly pour in the polenta. Whisk constantly for 2 minutes to prevent lumps. Simmer partially covered, stirring every few minutes for about 10–15 minutes or more, until the polenta grains are fully saturated and the polenta is thick and smooth.

Into the polenta, blend in the milk (half & half or sour cream), cheese, and butter. Check for seasoning and adjust as desired. If the polenta grains are not quite saturated, then add a little milk or water.

Polenta may be made up to 15–20 minutes ahead of time, and kept covered until ready to serve. Reheat in saucepan if needed.

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Vegetable Frittata with Turkey Bacon Lattice


Turkey Bacon Lattice on a Frittata, page 153

This is a fun way to add more protein to a vegetable frittata. If using turkey bacon, form the lattice on top of the vegetables and pour the egg batter over it all. No need to pre-cook the bacon, it will crisp up nicely over the egg.

I’ve never tried doing a lattice with pork bacon, but I’ve seen images online. Everything I have read suggests pre-cooking the bacon in the lattice form and then add on top of the frittata. And then cook the egg  If someone tries it with ‘real’ bacon please let me know how it went.

Plated frittata with a turkey bacon lattice topping

Plated frittata with a turkey-bacon lattice topping

Frittata with a turkey bacon lattice topping right out of the oven

Frittata with a turkey-bacon lattice topping right out of the oven

 

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Vegetable Frittatas: Chanticleer Inn Recipe


Vegetable Frittatas for Sunday Breakfast

Vegetable Frittatas, a generic name for a main egg dish, can have so many combinations of vegetables, meats and herbs. Whenever a frittata turns out to be more photogenic than usual, it’s nice to take the time and capture it for the blog.

I like taking advantage of the shapes and colors nature provides. Pictured here is a frittata baked in a round 8-ounce ceramic ramekin. Nestled on top of a bed of sauteed kale, the mini-bell pepper holds a turkey bacon rosette. To finish the tableau, sliced tomatoes and herbs frame the ramekin.

Vegetable frittatas baked in a ceramic ramekin

Vegetable Frittatas

Pictured below is the vegetable frittata plated with roasted potatoes. The potatoes were tossed in hot, spicy mustard and olive oil and baked in 400F oven.

Vegetable frittata plated with roasted potatoes, and garnished with herbs and a tomato slice

Vegetable frittata plated with roasted potatoes, and garnished with herbs and a tomato slice

 

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Fruit Parfait and Buttermilk Raisin Scones


Fruit Parfait and Buttermilk Raisin Scones

Fruit Parfait and Scones

Fruit Parfait (page 26) and Buttermilk Raisin Scones (page 62)

Fruit Parfait, page 26

Serving fruit parfait in clear glassware shows off the contrasting layers. This tasty and visually appealing dish combines two or three recipes — apple or stone fruit compote, yogurt cream, and granola — all of which can be made in advance and assembled just before serving. All of the recipes are in the Chanticleer Inn cookbook.

I make apple compote in large batches, primarily because we can serve up to 16 people for a single breakfast. Frequently, I will also portion out amounts for a future use and freeze the compote in Ziplock bags or Pyrex storage containers. In addition to fruit parfait, compote can be used in a number of recipes, such as, Apple Rose Tart, Fruit Crumble, or Dutch Babies.

Buttermilk Raisin Scones, page 62

These scones are a little sweeter than some of the others in the Chanticleer Inn cookbook, so I do not put a topping on the dough before baking.  I also add little vanilla, which gives the pastry some depth. These are lovely when served warm with a bit of butter — though there are the sweet-toothed who will want jam as well.

Recipes are found in the Chanticleer Inn B&B cookbook “Recipes Are Like Pearls … Lovely but not useful until strung together

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Tomato and Watermelon Salad with Balsamic Reduction


Tomato and Watermelon Salad with Balsamic Reduction, page 36

Tomato and Watermelon Salad with Balsamic Reduction

Tomato and Watermelon Salad with Balsamic
Reduction

My staffer Ember St. John while helping to assemble this salad quipped: ‘Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit, wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad … unless it is Ellen’s fruit salad.”
This very popular salad is refreshing on those bright sunny mornings that come before a hot afternoon. That said, this salad really could be served at any meal.
It is important that the ingredients are fresh and ripe. The ingredients are selected for the complimentary colors, as well to balance the sweet with tart and salty.

Recipe found in the Chanticleer Inn B&B cookbook “Recipes Are Like Pearls … Lovely but not useful until strung together”

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Omelet Maki in Chanticleer Inn Cookbook


Omelet Maki, page 137

Omelet maki a speciality of the Chanticleer inn B&B in ashland oregon

Omelet Maki Photo by Francesca Amery

Omelet Maki on page 137 in the “Recipes Are Like Pearls” cookbook.

In Japanese restaurant menus, maki [meaning roll] is used to refer to a type of sushi that is rolled in a log form, and then sliced into round servings, much like jelly rolls. 

There are many versions of an omelet roll on the Internet, though nearly none use the word maki, even though “omelet maki” more accurately describes this recipe both in appearance and in the process by which it is assembled.

Over the last few years, I have experimented with different fillings and methods. With critical (in a good sense) feedback and suggestions from my staff, we have settled on two versions, both are included in the Chanticleer Inn cookbook — one is a vegetarian and the other a meat version.

Omelet maki fillings will vary over the year, depending on what herbs are in the garden, what vegetables are in season, and who is with me in the kitchen. Filling ingredients that work best are those, when cooked, become soft and malleable, for example spinach and chard, but not broccoli. I like kale, but it should be well cooked.

Of all the savory dishes, omelet maki is my staff’s favorite – they particularly like it with Gorgonzola cheese. While you may choose whatever cheese you like best, do select one that easily melts.

Almost all the Internet recipes include flour, which we have discovered is not entirely necessary, though flour will make the rolling the cooked egg a little easier as its texture will be firmer. To be gluten-free, you can safely eliminate the flour and still enjoy the results.

Omelet Maki

Serves 6–8, Pre-heat oven 350°F
Baking sheet with rim or jellyroll pan, approximately 15”x11”x1”
Use parchment paper large enough to cover the baking sheet and run up the sides.

Ingredients

Maki (egg roll)

  • 4 ounces cream cheese or Neufchatel cheese, softened
  • 2 tablespoons all purpose flour (optional)
  • 12 eggs
  • 1 cup milk (whole or low-fat)

For after the eggs are cooked

  • 1–2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 cup cheddar cheese, grated

Filling #1

  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 2 cups chopped turkey bacon (optionally, cooked ham)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh herb(s), such as rosemary, oregano, savory, finely chopped
  • Pepper, to taste
  • 6 ounces Gorgonzola or bleu cheese, crumbled

Filling #2

  • 1/2 medium onion, diced
  • 1/2 cup chopped turkey bacon (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons fresh herb(s), such as rosemary, oregano, savory, finely chopped
  • Black pepper, ground to taste
  • 1/2 cup finely sliced mushrooms
  • 1/2 cup finely diced tomatoes without the seeds, or slow-roasted tomatoes, chopped (optional)
  • 8–10 ounces spinach (fresh or frozen) or chard, chopped, more if not using turkey bacon.
  • 4–6 ounces Gorgonzola or bleu cheese, crumbled

Directions
Lightly spray the baking pan with oil, just enough so the parchment paper will not slide around. Line the pan with parchment paper (make sure the corners are “mitered”) and spray the paper, and set aside.

In a medium large microwaveable bowl, soften cream cheese in the microwave for 30–60 seconds. Whisk the cream cheese to loosen and further soften it, then whisk in the flour. Whisk in, until well blended, an egg or two; then whisk in 1/4 cup of milk. Then continue to add the remaining milk and beat in the remaining eggs until the mixture is smooth.

To pour the egg mixture into the pan, start by pulling the middle rack most of the way out of the oven (this works better if the rack rolls, but even if it doesn’t roll pull out the rack a little bit). Place the baking pan on the oven rack; and then pour the egg batter into the pan. Slowly slide the rack back in place and bake at 350°F until eggs are puffed and set, for about 12–15 minutes.

While eggs are cooking, prepare the filling. Sauté the onions until they are soft and then add turkey bacon, cook on low heat until onions are translucent and the bacon starts to crisp up. Add ground black pepper, if desired.

If using Filling #2: lower the heat, and add the remaining ingredients, except the cheese. Let the mixture simmer to release the spinach’s water (or to soften the chard). Then turnoff the heat and cover the pan.

When eggs are done, remove from the oven and immediately spread mustard over the eggs and evenly sprinkle the cheddar cheese.

At this point, if you’re not ready to serve and still need 15–20 minutes to prep other breakfast items, keep eggs in a warming oven (at 170°F). When ready, re-heat the filling mixture and follow the steps below.

Spread the filling over the egg and sprinkle the Gorgonzola cheese on top of the filling.

Roll up (from the short side if serving 6 and long side if serving 8), peeling the parchment paper away while rolling. To serve, cut the maki (roll) into 6 or 8 slices with a serrated knife.

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Fruit Crumble in Chanticleer Inn Cookbook


Fruit Crumble II, page 24

Fruit Crumble II a Chanticleer Inn staff's favorite

Fruit Crumble II

Page 24 in the “Recipes Are Like Pearls” cookbook.

This continues to be one of my staff’s favorite first-course recipes. As the fruit vary with the seasons, the crumble is never really the same. Fruit crumble is an easy and tasty first course for a full breakfast. Also makes for a healthy dessert — yes, desserts can be healthy!

If you have already made some apple compote or stone fruit compote, you can use it as the base for the crumble. Sometimes we mix a little homemade jam with the fruit, or drop in bits of butter.

Dietary Note:
For a gluten-free version, exclude the flour, and increase the nuts and oatmeal.
For dairy-free, substitute coconut oil for the butter or drizzle in maple syrup to bind the oats.

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Apple Rose Tart in Chanticleer Inn Cookbook


Apple Rose Tart, page 18

Apple Rose Tart Chanticleer Inn speciality for small groups

Apple Rose Tart, page 18

Page 18 in the “Recipes Are Like Pearls” cookbook.

A quick Internet search will offer many recipes for these tarts, with various kinds of crusts, fillings, and methods of preparing the apples. These tarts are eminently photogenic (click on the image for a bigger picture); the images alone should entice you to do this recipe. Contrary to the way it may appear, the tarts are not at all difficult to create – however a bit time consuming.

I pulled from a few recipes, selecting the easiest and quickest techniques, while keeping true to the taste and presentation of the tart. While a regular wheat crust, such as pâte sablée, is more traditional, I usually prefer a nut crust for an apple rose tart, because it is quicker as there’s no need to rest the dough, and it can be gluten-free.

The tarts can be made in a single pie pan, as pictured above, or individual 6–8 ounce ramekins. The individual tartlets should feature a single large rose, with perhaps a ‘bud’ or two.

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Peach Boat in Chanticleer Inn Cookbook


Peach Boat, page 33

Summer Fruit

Peach Boat”

Page 33 in the “Recipes Are Like Pearls” cookbook.

A summer fruit favorite at the Chanticleer, one of the best things about the summer!

Fresh peaches, topped with thick creamy Meyer lemon yogurt  (non-fat, but doesn’t feel that way!) with raspberries and strawberries, decorated with zest of lemon and fresh garden mint.

The bowls consistently come back empty and suspiciously clean — are people licking the bowls for that last drop of sauce?

Summer Fruit

All lined up and ready to serve

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