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Ashland-bed-breakfast-news

Pond Lily, First of the Season


Chanticleer Inn Pond Lily

The pond plants are blooming! Michiko took this striking photo — it’s too good not to share!

Pond lily

Pond Lily

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Snowy Morning at the Chanticleer


Snowy Morning at the Chanticleer

snowy morning at the Chanticleer

Apple tree in the front yard

Snowy morning at the Chanticleer, today.  Not the usual sight for most of my B&B guests who visit during the summer months, so I thought I’d share what the garden looked like this morning.

Luckily the streets are clear and safe to drive later in the morning — no need to shovel, just enjoy a snowy morning at the Chanticleer while sipping piping hot coffee.

The dusting of snow stayed on the ground, but the sidewalks cleared up soon.  The mountains however are a different story, they are covered with lots of snow. Skiers are definitely doing the happy dance.  We all hope the snow pack builds up over winter, so we can recover from last year’s drought conditions.

For now we all can enjoy a quiet snow morning in Ashland

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“Head Over Heels” a Review


“Head Over Heels”
A Review by Desiree Remick

Play by Jeff Whitty
Music and Lyrics by the Go-Go’s,
Directed by Ed Sylvanus Iskandar

7-14-15

Head Over Heels

John Tufts, the clown, in “Head Over Heels”

“Head Over Heels”, true to its name, throws you head over heels into a world of enchanting musical madness, where entire kingdoms can pack up and hit the road on vacation, where a man disguised as an Amazon can be mistaken for a dainty lady in the dark, where the ability to dance is mandatory, and where everyone embraces her (or his) inner goddess. The play is three hours (with intermission), which in my opinion is a little excessive for a musical – but entertaining the whole way through. It blends old-fashioned themes and archaic language with modern speech and politics for a unique timeless flavor. Someone who struggles to understand Shakespeare and another who abhors twenty-first century lingo could find equal enjoyment in this theatre piece.
The play opens in the small kingdom of Arcadia, whose inhabitants are lifted from the 16th century Sir Philip Sidney classic of the same name. Duke Basilius tries his luck with an oracle and receives an unwelcome prophesy in four parts: first, that his eldest daughter will find love, but not with a man; second, that his younger daughter will take a liar to bed; third, that he and his wife will both commit adultery – with the same person, no less; and finally that before the year is out he will have given away his own crown. The good duke, who is not the sharpest knife in the drawer, announces his intent to take an extended ‘road trip’ to neighboring Bohemia, in an attempt to thwart his destiny. But of course, you can’t run away from fate.
There is drama. There is romance. There is comedy (much of it genuinely funny, which is not something that should be taken for granted). There is a lot of innuendo, breaking of the fourth wall, clever jokes and asides tailored to a knowledgeable audience – plenty of references that will slip past the kids – and don’t forget the music! There’s even a sword fight, which ends in the most unexpected way.

I did have some issues with the play as well. It takes an onerously long time to get going (long enough that the actors themselves start joking about it), and the ending also drags a bit. While the message of acceptance is a solid one, there are a few times where the writers allowed their enthusiasm to overflow, which resulted in a few unnecessary scenes and a soliloquy that does not fit with the rest of the script’s tone. Oh, and if your hearing is sensitive or you are prone to getting headaches from too much noise, I advise that you bring a pair of earplugs. The music is quite loud, and I was especially unfortunate in my seating arrangement, which placed me in front of some people who laughed and whistled directly into my ear at every chance.

In conclusion, however, I found “Head Over Heels” to be a lot of fun. If you love musicals or wild tales in the vein of Shakespeare, if you are a supporter of gay rights and the LGBT community, or if you just like to have a good time, this play is an evening well spent.

Chanticleer Inn Garden Spring Flowers


Chanticleer Inn Garden in Spring

Over the years, more than 1,500 bulbs have been planted throughout the gardens.  Some are early spring bloomers, such as those in these pictures, others are mid- and late-spring blooming.

Ever a challenge in the Chanticleer Inn garden, thankfully, the deer don’t like daffodils and hyacinths (yet).

Chanticleer Inn Garden

Daffodils

Chanticleer Inn garden

Tassel Bush and Red Camellias

Chanticleer Inn Garden

Wood Hyacinths

Chanticleer Inn Garden

Miniature Daffodils

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Camelot Theatre: “Sunset Boulevard”, starring Livia Genise


Camelot Theatre “Sunset Boulevard” — a Review

Livia Genise’s version of Sunset Boulevard is a “kinder, gentler version of tale told in classic Wilder movie” says Roberta Kent writing for the Daily Tidings.
I always love to promote the ‘other’ performing arts venues in the Rogue Valley.  The town of Talent, just a few miles up the road from Ashland, is the home of the Camelot Theatre.

This community theater does a wonderful job mainly due the untiring efforts of its Artist Director Livia Genise.

Livia Genise plays Norma Desmond and Nathan Monks is Joe Gillis in Camelot Theatre's production of "Sunset Boulevard." Photo courtesy of Steve Sutfin

Camelot Theatre’s production of “Sunset Boulevard.” Livia Genise plays Norma Desmond and Nathan Monks is Joe Gillis in Photo courtesy of Steve Sutfin

Music by Andrew Lloyd Webber
Book and Lyrics by Don Black and Christopher Hampton
Based on the Billy Wilder Film
Starring Livia Genise and Nathan Monks
Directed by Roy Von Rains, Jr.

Go here to read Roberta Kent’s review of “Sunset Boulevard

Details:
8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m.
Sundays through April 19 at the Camelot Theatre, 101 Talent Avenue, Talent.
For tickets ($25-29), call 541-535-5250 or go to www.camelottheatre.org

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St. Claire Productions presents: Josh Feinberg sitar and Ravi Albright tabla


Josh feinberg sitar

Josh Feinberg

Josh Feinberg sitar, with Ravi Albright, tabla traditional Indian ragas

Come and enjoy an evening of traditional Indian ragas with Feinberg and Albright this Saturday.

More about Josh Feinberg sitar and more about Ravi Albright tabla

Saturday, February 7, 2015 8pm
Tickets: $20/advance, $22/door, $10/teens 12-17,
children under 12 are free with paying adult.
Unitarian Fellowship, 4th and C Streets, Ashland

Often in the off-season the Chanticleer Inn B&B donates room(s) to Ariella St. Claire Production musicians. This coming weekend, we will be hosting Josh and Ravi.

 

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Lithia Park — Duck Pond with Maple Trees


Lithia Park

Lithia Park

Lithia Park, Duck Pond and Foliage

By far my favorite time to be in Lithia Park!  The park truly offers a four-season experience, but the colors of the Autumn are particularly stunning.

 

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Lithia Park, Designated “Great Places in America: Public Spaces”


Lithia Park Ashland Creek

Lithia Park Azaleas on Ashland Creek, [photo by: Ellen Campbell]

Lithia Park in Ashland Oregon Listed in American Planning Association’s “Great Places” for 2014

Lithia Park is truly the gem of Ashland. Locals  and visitors of Ashland already know and enjoy  Lithia Park — it’s truly the town’s heart and soul.  A place to meet friends,  hike trails, admire seasonal changes in the park, listen to concerts, play and even meditate.

This year Lithia Park is listed in American Planning Association’s (APA) “Great Places” program in the Public Spaces category.  This program honors places of exemplary character, quality, and planning.  Annually selected, Great Places meet a gold standard and criteria that have a substantial sense of place, cultural and historical interest, community involvement, and a vision for tomorrow.

According to APA:
APA Great Places offer better choices for where and how people work and live. They are enjoyable, safe, and desirable. They are places where people want to be — not only to visit, but to live and work every day. America’s truly great streets, neighborhoods and public spaces are defined by many criteria, including architectural features, accessibility, functionality, and community involvement.

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Chanticleer Inn on the Rogue River


Chanticleer Inn Staff on the Rogue River

All Smiles on the Rogue

Chanticleer Inn Staff Raft the Rogue River

For locals, a summer well spent means at least one day on the Rogue River.

Every year, I try to think of something that we all can do together as a way to thank my staff for all their wonderful assistance — and just plain wonderfulness. This year it was an afternoon on the River.

Indigo Creek guided us and did a stellar job. We all highly recommend them.  Indigo Creek Outfitters does more than just rafting, they also conduct Brewery Tours, guided vacations and fishing trips.

Chanticleer inn staff on the Rouge River

At the top of a rapid

I love my peeps!

 

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Dog-friendly Fountain


Dog-friendly Water Fountain

dog-friendly oasis

K-9 Water Fountain

On Granite St. a couple blocks off North Main you may find a dog-friendly watering hole.

A generous and kind resident set it up for our four-legged friends.

Low enough for most dogs to reach and lap up fresh water.

Ashland supports and cares for their dogs! The dog park on Nevada Street  has doggie pools for some of those hot summer days.

Check out my restaurant list where you can find which restaurants are dog-friendly and will serve their clients on sidewalk tables so their canine companions may be with the diners.

 

 

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