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Chamber Music Concerts: Brentano String Quartet


Brentano String Quartet

Brentano String Quartet plays at the SOU Music Recital Hall

Portrait of Brentano String Quartet

Brentano String Quartet

Friday, January 20, 2017 – 7:30pm | Saturday, January 21, 2017 – 3pm

Brentano String Quartet has appeared throughout the world to popular and critical acclaim. Within a few years of its formation in 1992, the quartet garnered the first Cleveland Quartet Award, Naumburg Chamber Music Award, and Chamber Music Society Two, a coveted distinction for chamber groups and individuals.

In recent seasons, the quartet has appeared in the US, Canada, Europe, Japan, and Australia. In 2014 became the Resident String Quartet at the Yale School of Music, succeeding the Tokyo Quartet in that position.

The group is named for Antonie Brentano, whom many scholars consider to be Beethoven’s “Immortal Beloved,” the intended recipient of his famous love confession.

EVENING SERIES: FRIDAY, JANUARY 20, 2017 – 7:30PM
Haydn – String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 20 no. 1
Kurtág – 6 Moments Musicaux
Beethoven – “Between Tides”
MATINEE SERIES: SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 2017 – 3PM
Mozart – String Quartet in E-flat Major, K. 428
Hartke – Commissioned work
Dvořák – String Quartet in C Major, Op. 61

For more information go to Chamber Music Concerts

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Spotlight on Billy Joel at the Camelot Theatre


Spotlight on Billy Joel

January 12 – 29, 2017

Starring David King-Gabriel

Tickets: $22 – $33

Spotlight on Billy Joel

Spotlight on Billy Joel

Billy Joel is an American pianist, singer-songwriter, performer, and composer. Since releasing his first hit song “Piano Man” in 1973, Joel has become the sixth best-selling recording artist and the third best-selling solo artist in the United States. Joel achieved 33 Top 40 hits through the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. He is also a six-time Grammy Award winner and sold more than 150 million records worldwide.

Camelot Theatre’s Spotlight performance will include songs such as: “Piano Man”, “Just the Way You Are”, “A New York State of Mind,” and others.

Camelot Theatre Company is located in Talent, Oregon in the beautiful Rogue Valley, just a few miles north of Ashland. We perform in the brand new state-of-the-art James M. Collier Theatre. Here is our Mission Statement:

To be of service to the Rogue Valley, Oregon, by producing high-quality affordable plays, musicals and musical events while providing a supportive environment for professional and amateur theatre artists and technicians and inspiring and training adults, teens and children in the theatre arts.

For more information and to purchase tickets to this performance at the Camelot Theatre go to their website.

 

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“Ecotone” by Pepper Trail


“Ecotone”

I am very fond of poetry, especially those poems about nature. Pepper Trail is a bit of a local legend. He is a research biologist specializing in ornithology.  He is about to retire from being the senior forensic scientist and ornithologist at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory in Ashland Oregon. He and his team fight wildlife trafficking.

A poem by Pepper Trail

“Not water alone does flow, but land
All its coverings and its inhabitants
The deer walking from valley to ridge
The birds and the every living thing
Find here, in a world of change, their place.”

 

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2017 Oregon Shakespeare Festival Plays: The Outlook


2017 Oregon Shakespeare Festival Plays: The Outlook

December is when the general public can start buying tickets for 2017 Oregon Shakespeare Festival plays.

Frequently I am asked about what I know and think about the upcoming plays. I can’t predict the future (wouldn’t that be nice!). I try to see all plays when they are in preview, and then write reviews; however sometimes the word quickly gets out about which one are the ‘don’t miss’ plays, then the tickets are hard to get. I think next year will be no exception.

The past can frequently predict the future

I can share with you a remarkably consistent pattern I’ve noticed over the last 15 years. Every season there are more than a few plays nearly every guest loves. Most of the time those plays are the new(er) plays, often those produced in the Thomas theater, and plays with social justice themes. I don’t think this pattern will be any different next year. Thus I look forward to seeing these 2017 Oregon Shakespeare Festival plays: Mojada: A Medea in Los Angeles, Hannah and the Dread Gazebo, and Off the Rails. Personally, I have loved every play August Wilson has written, and I am a fan of poetry, so in addition to the ‘modern’ plays, I eagerly await Unison.

Furthermore, given how well done 2016’s Richard II was, I think the two Henrys are going to be in that ‘don’t miss’ category. Jeffrey King, who played Henry Bolingbrooke in Richard II, will continue with his same character into the Henrys. I am really looking forward to seeing the History plays.

Three of the Festival’s accomplished and popular actors, Danforth Comins, Rodney Gardiner, and Armando Durán, are leads in Julius Caesar. Given current political events, the subtext in this play will no doubt evoke more powerful reactions than other past Julius Caesar plays.

I am interested in seeing what OSF will do with Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. At first I had reservations – Disney! Really? But since then I have heard that instead of strictly controlling the production to be a replica of every other Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, OSF has been given free rein to produce it how they want. Which is the reason OSF’s write up says: “Think you know the Disney musical? Think again. Expect originality, surprises and ingenuity in OSF’s gorgeous and powerful new rendition.” Personally, I hope OSF will evoke more the original 18th century version.

Based on current reservations for the Chanticleer Inn B&B, it already looks like we’re going to be busy next year. Yet, there are still plenty of rooms available during the 2017 summer months and more during the early and late part of the season.

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The Culinarium: a New Store in Town


The Culinarium, the Latest Kitchen Store in Town

The Culinarium on Main St. Ashland

The Culinarium on Main St. Ashland

The Culinarium with an apt byline “A Delicious Discovery” is Ashland’s the latest cook store with gourmet foods and high-end kitchenware.

At 270 E. Main St, this store is conveniently located. In fact, Chanticleer Inn guests will pass this store every time they walk to the Festival’s plays.

While there are other stores for small kitchen gadgets, many of us have missed having a store completely dedicated to the kitchen and cooking — with much more inventory.

The owners, Constance and David Jesser, are very knowledgeable about all their products and about cooking. After the crazy holiday rush, starting sometime in the Spring 2017, Constance will be conducting cooking classes.

For more information and place to shop online for those gourmet foods go to their website: here! The Ashland Locals Guide wrote an article about the shop, and the owners Constance and David.

 

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My Garden, a Poem


My Garden, a Poem by Ellen

Last October 2016, Gini Grossenbacher conducted a writing workshop at the Chanticleer Inn B&B. I was kindly invited to join the other ladies in the morning writing exercises.

In one of those exercises, Gini asked us to choose a place; and then given 15 minutes to write about it. It will come to no surprise to some, I chose my garden at the B&B. Here is the poem:

My Garden

I garden alone, but it’s not a solitary task.
Plants talk in long sentences that stretch over seasons and years. Gardeners must adjust their attention span.
Scrub Jays repeatedly dart in and out of the hedge. Note to self, prune carefully near that spot.
Pine cone cobs scattered and tossed about, squirrels make more work.
Invasive carpeting of weeds. I can never remember its Latin name, but appropriately it rhythms with ‘damn it’.

by Ellen Campbell, October 2016

Gini Grossenbacher is a wonderful teacher, published writer, historical novelist in 19th century San Francisco and WWII spies. For more information on Gini go to www.ginigrossenbacher.com

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Delgani String Quartet


The Delgani String Quartet Debuts in Southern Oregon

The acclaimed Delgani String Quartet with Rickie Birran of “Man of Words Theatre Company” combines music and literature in a three collaborative performances: December 15, 16, and 17, 2016. [For locations, please see below.]

The performances will couple texts by John Milton, Lewis Carroll, Robert Browning, and William Blake  with new music by the renowned composer Paul Safar. Rounding out the program is Beethoven’s C major Razumovsky Quartet.

Paul Safar

  • Satan Speaks from Paradise Lost
  • The Walrus and the Carpenter
  • The Pied Piper of Hamelin
  • The Tyger

Ludwig van Beethoven
String Quartet in C Major, Op. 59 No. 3

Delgani String Quartet and Man of Words Theatre

Delgani String Quartet and Man of Words Theatre

Delgani String Quartet and Man of Words Theatre in three Southern Oregon performances:

Hill Violin Shop
Date: December 15 @ 7:30 pm
Location: Kings Highway, Medford OR 97501
SOLD OUT Inquire at (541) 621-7091

Paschal Winery
Date: December 16 @ 7 pm
Location: 1122 Suncrest Rd Talent, OR 97540
Tickets at the door $20 and $5 students

Newman UMC
Date: December 17 @ 3 pm
Location: 132 NE B St., Grants Pass, OR 97526
Tickets at the door $20 and $5 students

Janine Wei, Wyatt True, Erci, and Kimberlee

The Delgani Four: from left to right: Janine, Wyatt, Eric, and Kimberlee

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Tomato Egg Cups with Creamy Polenta: Chanticleer Inn Favorite


Tomato Egg Cups with Polenta

Tomato egg cups are really easy to do and they present so well. Serve them nestled in a pool of creamy cheesy polenta or in a colorful hash; or serve with a side of roasted potatoes or zucchinis.
The selection of vegetables, meats, and cheese, as well as the amounts, can vary depending on the season and your taste.

For more information about the Chanticleer Inn Cookbook go here.

Tomato Egg Cups Nestled in Polenta

Tomato Egg Cups Nestled in Creamy Polenta

Recipes for Tomato Egg Cups with Polenta

Tomato Egg Cups

6 servings  and  Pre-heat oven 350°F

Use six 4-inch silicone muffin cups lightly sprayed with oil.

The selection of vegetables and cheese, as well as the amounts, can vary depending on the season and your taste. The cook should treat the ingredient list below as a starting point!

Ingredients

  • 2-3 medium sized mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 medium-small zucchini, sliced
  • 6 medium tomatoes
  • 6 broccoli florets, small enough to almost fill each tomato
  • 6 tablespoons cheese, grated (my staff and I prefer strong cheeses, such as, Parmesan, Gorgonzola or cheddar)
  • 8-10 eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk (omit if lactose-free, but increase the number of eggs and amount of salsa)
  • 3-4 tablespoons butter, melted, and cooled
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup green salsa
  • 1-2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, minced (optionally, sage and/or oregano)

Directions

If using silicone muffin cups, lightly spray oil; if using metal muffin tin then liberally spray the muffin tin cups.

Place a zucchini slice at the bottom of each muffin cup and at least three around the cup walls. Also place mushroom slices around the cup walls.

For each tomato, slice the top off and scoop out the pulp. (I save the sliced top, minus the stem core, and the pulp to use in a future frittata) Place each tomato in the middle a silicone/muffin tin cup with the zucchini and mushroom slices evenly encircling the tomato. It’s desirable, but not necessary, if the tomato rim is a little higher than the rim of the cup.

Partially fill each tomato with the grated cheese, if the cheese spills over into the muffin tin that’s fine. Finish by inserting a broccoli floret into each tomato. It’s o.k. if the top of the floret is a little higher than the tomato rim.

In a medium bowl, whisk eggs, milk, butter, and minced garlic, then add salsa. Pour the egg mixture around the tomatoes and some inside each tomato.

Bake the tomato egg cups in a 350°F oven for 15-20 minutes, or until the egg is set.

Polenta

6 servings  Use heavy saucepan

Ingredients

  • 3 cups water (or 2 cup water and 1 cup broth)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup polenta
  • 1/2 cup milk, (alternatively, half & half or sour cream)
  • 1-3 tablespoons butter (optional, but recommended)
  • 1/3 cup gorgonzola

Directions

In a large saucepan, bring the water (or water and broth) and salt to a boil. While whisking, slowly pour in the polenta. Whisk constantly for 2 minutes to prevent lumps. Simmer partially covered, stirring every few minutes for about 10-15 minutes or more, until the polenta grains are fully saturated and the polenta is thick and smooth.

Into the polenta, blend in the milk (half & half or sour cream), cheese, and butter. Check for seasoning and adjust as desired. If the polenta grains are not quite saturated, then add a little milk or water.

Polenta may be made up to 15-20 minutes ahead of time, and kept covered until ready to serve. Reheat in saucepan if needed.

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“The Bricks” Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Redo


The Bricks

As soon as the OSF’s 2016 season closed, the city blocked off Pioneer St and started to rip out the plaza area between the Bowmer Theater and the city street — the area fondly referred to as The Bricks. A much needed and long-time in coming redo as the slope of the surface was difficult to navigate even for the completely able-bodied.

Here are pictures taken in November 2016 at the start of the reconstruction:

The Bricks November 2016

The OSF campus, November 2016

 

Access for All

Access for All

Many have received letters, and even calls, asking for donations to help in the project to redo the bricked plaza area where OSF conducts the Green Show. This capital project is important to both OSF and the City of Ashland.

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Prose-Poetry Creative Writing Workshop by Gini Grossenbacher


Prose-Poetry Creative Writing
Workshop by Gini Grossenbacher

In October 2016, Gini Grossenbacher conducted a Prose-Poetry Creative Writing Workshop at the inn. She is a very encouraging teacher.

Gini would assign several short writing exercises each day. When Gini asked us to find an object and write about it, one of the attendees, Judy, was inspired by a vase in the Jardin room. She wrote a cute short called “Antique TV”, for your reading pleasure here it is:

“Antique TV”
by Judy Vaughan

I knew I would take it to the Country Roads Antique Show audition if I ever got the chance. The day the wildly popular TV show came to Stockton, I packed it up in bubble wrap and a recycled Amazon box. What was it? A vase, I guess. Some sort of pottery piece glazed and fired in greens and browns.
The line stretched around the gym at UOP. I shamelessly gawked at a woman pushing a merchandise cart with a Homeboy Depot label peeling off the handle. A hideous — oh—I mean abstract sculpture of black wrought iron poked through the sides like the limbs of a spider monkey bent on escape.
Was that a hat or a lampshade held high by the man who wore Tommy Hilfiger with pink socks?
The volunteer at the registration desk directed me to the China/Pottery table. I added my treasure, stripped of its wrapping, to the Havilland demitasse set I’d seen last week on E-Bay, several fruit bowls and a collection of plump black animals. Native American or netsuke?
The curator’s eyes widened as she fingered the ridges of the tulip-shaped opening of my piece. She touched the frog on the base. A suppressed giggle escaped her as she traced its tiny hands.
“I need to show this to a colleague,” she said. “Put on your make up, honey.” She sent me to a curtained off area of the gym labeled Green Room. “Wait there until the director calls you.” A frisson of cool tingle swept over me. I was going to be on the TV show.
The furry microphone brushed my forehead. Would the lights make me sweat? The curator preened as the director counted down the scene to Action. “This wonderful pot glazed in earth tones has a funnel-shaped opening that gives us a clue to its use. The palm leaf frieze around the bottom hints at a Greek origin. What’s amazing are the figures on the base, the cunning frogs and these grey and tan figures. Do you know what they are?” She thrust the microphone into my face.
I stammered. “Flower buds?”
“No … my colleague and I think they are copied from fourteenth century motifs from the Wee Wee province of China. Can I ask how much you paid for it?
I pictured the pot on the shelf of the nightstand in the B and B in Ashland, Oregon. “Uh.” I tried to think of a polite way to describe concealing it in the underwear section of my suitcase the day I checked out.
The curator didn’t wait for my answer. She upended the vase, “It’s signed,” she said and that’s really unusual in a piece like this.”
A dramatic pause ensued before the reveal.
“Do you know how much it’s worth?”
“A few hundred dollars, I guess. It’s been on the shelf over our Steinway for several years.”
“Well. I’ve shown this to my colleague from Kristi’s….See this oval sticker above the maker’s mark?”
“The one that says Made in China,” I asked?
“Yes, you can see it’s gold leaf, one of the first occasions for such a adhesive appendage. The piece itself is most likely a chamber pot, possibly a cuspidor. Auction value now is astronomical. You should have it insured for as much as your Steinway.”
“Wow … That’s amazing…I had no idea!

 

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